IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 54872        Make/Model: C172      Description: 172, P172, R172, Skyhawk, Hawk XP, Cutla
  Date: 01/03/2012     Time: 0335

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: CONROE   State: TX   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT LOST POWER WHILE ON APPROACH. THE AIRCRAFT LANDED ON A HIGHWAY AND 
  STRUCK A POLE. CONROE, TX

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Other      Phase: Approach      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: HOUSTON, TX  (SW09)                   Entry date: 01/04/2012
 



On July 21, 2008, at 1030 eastern daylight time, a Maule MT-7-235, N142CP, nosed over during landing roll at Richard B. Russell Airport (RMG), Rome, Georgia. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airline transport pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The airplane was registered to and operated by the Civil Air Patrol Incorporated, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The flight departed from RMG the same day at 1015. The pilot stated that during the initial touchdown, the nose gear collapsed. He said that as the airplane slowed down, the propeller dug into the ground and the airplane stopped suddenly and nosed over inverted.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the nose gear oleo strut was broken, and the firewall was buckled. The nose gear oleo strut was sent to the National Transportation Safety Board materials laboratory for further examination. Examination of the oleo strut revealed that all of the fractures were on a slant plane, and were consistent with overstress fracture. There was no indication of any pre-existing fatigue cracking or corrosion.

Accident occurred Friday, February 20, 2009 in Kenai, AK
Aircraft: de Havilland DHC-2, registration: N5342G
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On February 20, 2009, about 1515 Alaska standard time, a wheel/ski-equipped de Havilland DHC-2 (Beaver) airplane, N5342G, sustained substantial damage during takeoff from a remote frozen lake, about 10 miles northeast of Kenai, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) local area proficiency/instructional flight under Title 14, CFR Part 91, when the accident occurred. The airplane was operated by the Civil Air Patrol Inc. (CAP), Anchorage, Alaska. The three people aboard, the first pilot, a certificated flight instructor seated in the right seat, the second pilot, seated in the left seat, and a pilot-rated passenger, were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and CAP flight following procedures were in effect. The flight originated at the Kenai Municipal Airport, Kenai, about 1445.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), on February 20, the flight instructor reported that the purpose of the flight was to familiarize the second pilot with wheel/ski operations of a de Havilland DHC-2 airplane. He said that after the second pilot completed a series of touch-and-go landings on the frozen lake, he took the flight controls to demonstrate the next landing and takeoff. He said that after landing he applied full engine power for takeoff, but the airplane failed to climb, and it collided with a stand of trees at the edge of the lake. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings, fuselage, and empennage.

Accident occurred Friday, November 14, 2008 in Fairbanks, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N47417
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On November 14, 2008, about 1533 Alaska Standard time, a Cessna 152, N47417, and a Cessna 182R, N9772H, collided in midair about .5 miles from the approach end of runway 19L at the Fairbanks International Airport, Fairbanks, Alaska. N47417 was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) local area instructional flight, and received minor damage. N9772H was being operated as CAP 5043, a Civil Air Patrol (CAP) VFR positioning flight, and sustained substantial damage. Both airplanes were operated under Title 14, CFR Part 91, when the accident occurred. The flight instructor and the student pilot aboard N47417, were not injured. The private pilot and the pilot rated passenger aboard N9772H, were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed.

***

Accident occurred Friday, November 14, 2008 in Fairbanks, AK
Aircraft: CESSNA 182R, registration: N9772H
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On November 14, 2008, about 1533 Alaska Standard time, a Cessna 152, N47417, and a Cessna 182R, N9772H, collided in midair about .5 miles from the approach end of runway 19L at the Fairbanks International Airport, Fairbanks, Alaska. N47417 was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) local area instructional flight, and received minor damage. N9772H was being operated as CAP 5043, a Civil Air Patrol (CAP) VFR positioning flight, and sustained substantial damage. Both airplanes were operated under Title 14, CFR Part 91, when the accident occurred. The flight instructor and the student pilot aboard N47417, were not injured. The private pilot and the pilot rated passenger aboard N9772H, were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) personnel from the Fairbanks Flight Standards District Office (FSDO), reported that the Cessna 182R had been cleared by controllers at the Fairbanks Air Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) for landing on runway 19L, and was established on a long final approach. The Cessna 152 was on a right downwind traffic pattern for landing on runway 19L, and was number two for landing. The pilot of the Cessna 152 was told to extend his downwind pattern, and then to execute a right 360 degree turn to allow additional spacing between landing airplanes. The pilot of the Cessna 152 made a left 360 degree turn. The left wingtip of the Cessna 152 struck the rudder of the Cessna 182R. Both airplanes landed safely.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), on November 14, the flight instructor of the Cessna 152 reported that he was on a right downwind for landing, and the student pilot was at the controls. The flight instructor said that he was told to extend his downwind pattern, which he did as requested, and then turned base. The CAP Cessna 182R was "in sight," and he heard the CAP airplane being cleared for landing by ATCT. He turned final for landing, and about 300 feet agl, the nose of the CAP airplane appeared under his airplane. He applied full power and began a left climbing turn. The ATCT advised him to make a right 360 degree turn, but he was already in a left turn, and advised ATCT of his actions. He then asked the ATCT to visually check his landing gear as he flew past the tower, and was told everything looked O.K. He then entered right traffic and landed without further incident. After landing, he discovered the leading edge of the left wing was flattened and dented at the tip, and the wingtip fairing was cracked and broken.

During a telephone conversation with the NTSB IIC, on November 17, the pilot ofthe Cessna 182R reported that he initially departed Eielson Air Force Base, Fairbanks, to position the CAP airplane at Fairbanks. He did some touch and go landings at Fort Wainwright Air Base, Fairbanks, and then flew inbound for landing at Fairbanks International. He was given a straight-in landing for runway 19L, and was established on a long final approach. He heard the ATCT clear other airplanes as number two and three to land, and heard another pilot say that traffic was "in sight." During the landing approach, the pilot heard a "bang" and the airplane yawed, but he saw no other airplanes. He thought that the airplane had been struck by a bird, so he asked ATCT to visually check his landing gear. He was advised that all three gear were visible, so he completed the landing. After landing, he discovered that the top of the rudder had sustained denting, and the rudder cap was broken and missing. The pilot was under the impression that his airplane had been struck by a bird until FAA Fairbanks FSDO personnel arrived to begin their investigation.

The Fairbanks ATCT issued a pilot deviation report for the Cessna 152. Further investigation of the accident is pending.

Accident occurred Thursday, August 09, 2007 in Bremerton, WA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/29/2007
Aircraft: Cessna 182P, registration: N1298M
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

The operator reported that the pilot was taking a Civil Air Patrol check ride. He was demonstrating a short field landing to a designated spot and tried to stretch the glide of the airplane. This allowed the airspeed to dissipate to the point of stall. The airplane bounced hard on the runway and a go around was executed. After flying to another airport and making a full stop landing, damage to the airplane's firewall and fuselage was discovered.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain airspeed during the landing flare. A factor was the encounter of the stall and subsequent hard landing.

Accident occurred Saturday, June 09, 2007 in Clear, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/29/2007
Aircraft: Schleicher ASK-21, registration: N621CP
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

The flight instructor was conducting student training in the airport traffic pattern under Title 14, CFR Part 91. On short final the dual student deployed full spoilers, resulting in the glider touching down short of the runway. The nose wheel of the glider impacted the edge of the runway threshold, damaging the landing gear attachment and the fuselage.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The dual student's misjudged distance/altitude during the final approach to land, and the flight instructor's inadequate supervision of the student, which resulted in an undershoot, and substantial damage.

Accident occurred Tuesday, April 24, 2007 in Sierra Blanca, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 6/27/2007
Aircraft: Maule MXT-7-180, registration: N800CP
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

The 1,471-hour commercial pilot lost control of the single-engine airplane while attempting to abort a crosswind landing on a closed runway. The flight had originated from the accident location where the pilot arrived earlier in the day to pick-up an aerial observer. The flight was scheduled in support of a local sheriff department that has requested assistance in locating a stolen vehicle in a remote rural area. The search for the stolen vehicle was discontinued by the pilot after he became aware that a nearby airport had issued a high wind warning for the area. The mishap took place when the pilot elected to return to the airport to drop-off the observer. The pilot reported that he planned for a straight-in approach to runway 21. The closed airport was not equipped with a windsock; however, the pilot reported that he was aware that a strong right crosswind was present when he was established on final approach with the flaps extended to the 24-degree setting. The winds at the KELP airport at the time of the accident were reported from 270 degrees at 14 knots, gusting to 26 knots. The pilot added that soon after the right main landing gear tire touched down on the runway, a gust of wind attempted to roll the aircraft to the left and the pilot elected to apply full engine power to abort the landing. During the attempted aborted landing, the airplane collided with tall bushes lining both sides of the runway, continued through a fence, and finally came to rest on a pasture east of the runway. The right wing and the both horizontal stabilizers sustained structural damage. The pilot and the observer were not injured.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The loss of control as result of the pilot's failure to compensate for the existing wind conditions. A contributing factor was the crosswind.

Accident occurred Tuesday, August 29, 2006 in Winder, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 8/30/2007
Aircraft: Cessna 172R, registration: N856CP
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

The student pilot stated that he dropped off his flight instructor on the ramp prior to conducting his first solo. He then taxied to runway 31 to perform a normal takeoff. After takeoff the student pilot entered the left traffic pattern for the runway 31 visual approach. The student pilot flew the downwind, base, and final for runway 31. On landing flare the main wheels touched down, and the airplane began to veer to the left. The student pilot added full power in an attempt to regain control of the airplane. The wing flaps were still in the full down position. The airplane became airborne, continued to veer to the left, and collided with the bravo taxiway sign. The student pilot did not report any mechanical problems with the aircraft prior to the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's failure to maintain control of the airplane during an attempted go-around.

Accident occurred Sunday, July 23, 2006 in Big Lake, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 2/26/2007
Aircraft: de Havilland DHC-2, registration: N5146G
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

The first pilot was conducting a local area Title 14 CFR Part 91 proficiency/instructional flight in a float-equipped airplane with the second pilot. Both pilots were certificated flight instructors. After landing at a lake, the second pilot practiced making step turns. The first pilot, seated in the right seat, then took the flight controls to demonstrate continuous water taxiing/turning while on-step. He said he taxied around the perimeter of the lake and began a right turn, still on-step, but the airplane did not respond. Application of right rudder did not prevent the airplane from colliding with the lake shore and trees. The airplane received damage to the left wing and fuselage. The first pilot indicated that the wind was about 6 knots from the north-northeast, but he thought the airplane encountered a wind shear at the narrowest portion of the lake where the accident occurred.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain control of the airplane while step taxiing a float-equipped airplane, which resulted in a collision with an embankment. A factor contributing to the accident was an unfavorable wind.

Accident occurred Tuesday, May 17, 2005 in Islip, NY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 1/31/2006
Aircraft: Cessna 172P, registration: N9344L
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

As the pilot taxied from his parking spot, he made a left 90-degree turn, onto a taxiway. As the turn was completed, the airplane's right wing struck a parked vehicle.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain clearance from a parked vehicle while taxiing.

NYC05LA123

On May 17, 2005, at 1630 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172P, N9344L, operated by the Civil Air Patrol, was substantially damaged when it struck a vehicle while taxiing at the Long Island MacArthur Airport (ISP), Islip, New York. The certificated private pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight conducted under 14 CFR Part 91.

According to the Civil Air Patrol, as the pilot taxied from his parking spot, he made a left 90-degree turn, onto a taxiway. As the turn was completed, the airplane's right wing struck a parked vehicle.

The pilot failed to respond to several requests made by the Safety Board, for his statement regarding the accident.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed the airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

On March 13, 2005, about 1315 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 182Q, N96985, registered to and operated by the Civil Air Patrol as a 14 CFR Part 91 qualifying checkout flight, experienced a hard landing at Sanderson Field Airport, Shelton, Washington. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed. The aircraft was substantially damaged and the certificated private pilot-in-command and the flight instructor (check-out pilot) were not injured. The flight departed from Bremerton, Washington, at 1210.

The check-out pilot reported that the landing was accomplished to runway 05 with winds from 30 degrees at 12 knots, gusting to 21 knots. During the flare for landing, with the private pilot in command, the airspeed rapidly decreased from 60 knots to 40 knots. The check-out pilot immediately added full throttle, but the aircraft landed hard on the main wheels. The check-out pilot took control of the aircraft during the resulting bounce and initiated a go-around. During the climb, the check-out pilot determined there was no unairworthy mechanical, electrical, structural conditions, or adverse aircraft handling characteristics and opted to return to Bremerton where a landing was made without further incident.

Maintenance personnel at Bremerton inspected the aircraft and found wrinkles in the skin forward of the right side door post, wrinkles to the firewall and lower stringer.

On June 9, 2004, at approximately 2110 mountain daylight time, a Cessna C172P, N9474L, operated by the New Mexico Wing of the Civil Air Patrol (CAP), was destroyed when the pilot attempted to make a go around at Las Cruces International Airport (LRU), Las Cruces, New Mexico. The private pilot received serious injuries and the passenger received minor injuries. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed. No flight plan had been filed for the cross-country flight being conducted under the provisions of Title 14 CFR Part 91. The flight to Albuquerque, New Mexico, was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the accident report submitted by the CAP, the airplane had just departed LRU when the low voltage light illuminated and the pilot returned to LRU. The pilot transmitted on the Unicom frequency that he was "turning base to final for runway 26" but was actually turning base to final for runway 22. The pilot of another CAP airplane heard this report and elected to take off on runway 22. The pilot of N9474L sighted the other aircraft on the runway and made a 360-degree turn for spacing purposes. During the turn, the airplane struck large mesquite bushes and collided with terrain. The nose wheel was severed, and the airplane nosed over and slid into a fence. The engine mounts were broken, the wing struts were bent and the vertical stabilizer was crushed. The pilot sustained broken bones.

Prior to the flight, the accident pilot had performed three take-off, landing and taxi back procedures to renew his night flight currency for carriage of passengers. (49 CFR Part 61.56) His last night flight was on September 1, 2003. According to the report, the pilot had flown for 6.9 hours on the day of the accident.

On January 18, 2004, at 1040 mountain standard time, a Cessna 182Q, N5202N, owned and operated by the Civil Air Patrol, Inc., and piloted by a private pilot, sustained substantial damage during a hard landing at St. George Municipal Airport (SGU), St. George, Utah. The private pilot and pilot-rated passenger on board the airplane were not injured. The personal flight was being conducted under the provisions of Title 14 CFR Part 91 without a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The local flight originated at approximately 1015.

The pilot reported that he was performing touch and go landings. On his third landing, the pilot said the airplane touched down normally, but then became airborne again. The pilot said he delayed putting the power in, thinking the airplane would settle. The airplane's nose dropped and the nose gear hit the runway resulting in a bounced landing. The pilot executed a go around, flew the airplane around the pattern, and made an uneventful full stop landing.

An inspection of the airplane after the flight revealed that the lower right side of the firewall was bent aft. The right side fuselage, aft of the fuselage/firewall intersection was wrinkled to just aft of the static port, and one propeller blade was bent aft at the blade tip. Flight control continuity was confirmed. An examination of the engine, engine controls, and other airplane systems revealed no anomalies.

Wind conditions at the time of the accident were 090 degrees at 3 knots.

Accident occurred Saturday, November 22, 2003 in Wausau, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 7/29/2004
Aircraft: Cessna 182R, registration: N323KW
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

The airplane sustained substantial damage during a hard landing . The pilot stated, "On the last cross wind landing [using] runway [12] no flaps was holding 80 [knots]. Did a practice engine out on short final. The plane came to a stop when the power was pulled. Air speed was at 80 [knots] dropped to nothing, and then the plane [sunk] on to the runway." The flight instructor stated, "After reducing power I asked him if we were holding 75 [knots] ok and he said yes. Then all of a sudden the aircraft settled very fast and we hit hard and bounced and we were headed for the grass, the left side of the runway, I took the control wheel [and] kept us on the runway." Recorded wind at the airport was 060 degrees at 8 knots. The pilot and flight instructor reported no mechanical malfunctions associated with the flight.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot 's improper flare which resulted in a hard landing, and the flight instructors inadequate supervision.

On July 25, 2003, at 1300 central standard time, a Cessna 172P, N99040, operated by the Civil Air Patrol (CAP), received substantial damage during a bounced landing on runway 27 (5,000 feet by 75 feet asphalt) at Huntingburg Airport (HNB), Huntingburg, Indiana. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The 14 CFR Part 91 flight was not operating on a flight plan. The private pilot reported no injuries. The flight originated from Paoli, Indiana, at 1230, and was en route to HNB.

The pilot reported she realized she was too high while on final, and added full flaps. The pilot stated the airplane touched down, bounced, and the propeller struck the pavement. The airplane bounced again before coming to a stop.

The pilot stated she could have avoided the accident by performing a go-around.

The pilot reported no mechanical functions or defects during the accident flight.

The HNB Automated Surface Observing System, recorded at 1255, wind 150 degrees at 6 knots.

The pilot, age 72, was a member of the CAP, Indiana Wing and held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land rating issued on May 21, 1981. The pilot was issued an instrument airplane rating on November 22, 1994. The pilot accumulated a total flight time of 1,079.8 hours, of which 229.9 hours were in the accident airplane make and model and 28.2 hours were in the last 90 days.

On July 25, 1990, the pilot was involved in an incident in which she lost directional control during takeoff of a Cessna 172, N6621B, at Falls of Rough, Kentucky. The nose gear then collapsed when the airplane ran off the runway. The yoke lock was noted not to have been removed.

On July 12, 1995, the pilot became a member of the CAP, Indiana Wing. The CAP does not conduct a pilot background check on its pilot applicants. Applicants are asked on their initial application forms whether they have been involved in any incident/accidents. The pilot's application was not available for review since applications were reported to be retained by the CAP for four years.

CAP pilot applicants were never queried about previous incidents/accidents on their applications. The accident pilot's application was not available for review since CAP applications were reported retained by the CAP for four years.

Accident occurred Thursday, June 12, 2003 in Hobbs, NM
Probable Cause Approval Date: 3/30/2004
Aircraft: Cessna 182R, registration: N6319H
Injuries: 1 Minor.

The Civil Air Patrol private pilot had recently (he had logged 24 tows) been signed off to tow gliders. He said that his initial climb incline was 20 degrees, and his airspeed was approximately 50 knots [the airplane's Pilot's Operating Handbook states that the flaps up, power off stall speed is 54 knots]. Several witnesses said that the airplane departed at a high angle of attack, and then mush/stalled into a T-hangar. Post accident examination of the airplane revealed that both wings were bent and wrinkled, and both the fuselage and empennage were bent and wrinkled. The density altitude was calculated to be 7,070 feet.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain airspeed, which resulted in a stall.

On May 17, 2003, at 1600 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182R, N9849H, owned and operated by Civil Air Patrol Inc., was substantially damaged during a hard landing at Boulder Municipal Airport (1V5), Boulder, Colorado. The private pilot and his two passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. No flight plan had been filed for this cross-country flight being conducted under Title 14 CFR Part 91. The flight originated from Boulder at 1500.

The pilot stated that the winds were "approximately 5 mph out of the east." With full flaps and an airspeed of 70 knots, he set up for an approach to runway 08. As they passed over the threshold, the airplane dropped approximately 25 feet and hit the runway. When the airplane bounced, he applied full power to regain control, landed on the runway and taxied to the parking area. He said he never heard the stall warning horn and didn't feel any change in the wind. The impact with the runway collapsed the nose landing gear, and buckled the firewall. No damage to the propeller was noted.

One witness stated that the airplane appeared to be in a nose high attitude on final approach. At approximately 15 to 20 feet above the runway, the "descent was momentarily halted," after which, the airplane "quickly" descended in a "mush" to the runway. The airplane touched down in a nose high attitude with both main landing gear and then the nose landing gear. The airplane "bounced" back into the air, then landed and taxied to the parking area under its own power.

At 1547, the reported weather at Boulder Municipal Airport was, wind, 130 degrees at 12 knots; visibility, 40 statute miles; sky condition, few at 090, broken at 250 feet; temperature, 28 degrees C.; dew point, 06 degrees C.; altimeter setting, 29.87.

Accident occurred Tuesday, September 10, 2002 in Mocksville, NC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 2/5/2004
Aircraft: Cessna 172P, registration: N62602
Injuries: 2 Serious.

The pilot was conducting touch and go landings when on the accident landing, the airplane touched down about two-third down the runway. On the go phase of the touch and go maneuver, the pilot established a nose high attitude followed by a right descending roll followed by the subsequent collision with trees. The airplane rested on the ground in a nose low attitude. No mechanical problems were reported by the pilot prior to the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain airspeed during the takeoff and initial climb which resulted in an inadvertent stall and the subsequent collision with trees.

ATL02LA168

On September 10, 2002, at 1145 eastern daylight time a Cessna 172P, N62602, registered to Civil Air Patrol Inc., and operated by a private pilot, collided with the ground shortly after takeoff from a touch and go landing on runway 9, at the Mocksville Twin Lakes Airport in Mocksville, North Carolina. The flight was operated under the provision of Title 14 CFR Part 91, and visual flight rules. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The pilot and pilot rated passenger received serious injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The flight departed Mocksville Sugar Valley Airport, Mocksville, North Carolina at 1100.

Accident occurred Saturday, August 31, 2002 in New Roads, LA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 6/2/2004
Aircraft: Cessna 182-Q, registration: N96725
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

The single-engine airplane landed hard on Runway 36. The 987-hour pilot reported that after completing two touch and go landings, the third landing would be a short field landing followed by a full stop. The pilot stated they were in a stable approach for Runway 36. As the airplane cleared the runway approach lights, the pilot verified the flaps were full down, and the airspeed was 60 knots. The airplane was inside the last light of the approach light system (ALS), between 50 and 100 feet AGL, when she heard the stall warning horn, and the airplane began to rapidly lose altitude. The pilot applied power; however, the airplane continued to lose altitude. The airplane touched down "hard" 40 feet short of the runway, and continued to roll for approximately 1,000 feet before coming to a stop. During the rollout, the pilot reported that the nose dropped abnormally low. The pilot instructed the passengers to unbuckle their seat belts and exit the aircraft as soon as it stopped.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain airspeed which resulted in a stall.

FTW02LA246

On August 31, 2002, at 1055 central daylight time, a Cessna 182-Q single-engine airplane, N96725, was substantially damaged following a hard landing at the False River Air Park Airport near New Roads, Louisiana. The airplane was registered to and operated by the Civil Air Patrol, Louisiana Wing. The commercial pilot and two passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a flight plan was not filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 public use flight. The orientation flight originated from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, at 1015.

Accident occurred Monday, July 29, 2002 in Mc Allen, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 9/30/2003
Aircraft: Cessna 182Q, registration: N4896N
Injuries: 1 Minor.

During his preflight inspection, the pilot determined that he had sufficient fuel (65 gallons) for the planned cross-country flight. He filed a flight time of 3 hour 15 minutes on his VFR flight plan with an en route stop for deplaning the passengers and a final destination for refueling the airplane. The actual flight time was 2.9 hours. On final approach at the destination airport, the pilot transmitted in part: "I'm declaring an emergency I'm running out of fuel." Subsequently, radar contact was lost with the airplane and there were no further transmissions from the pilot. The airplane landed in a field short of the runway. During the landing roll in the field, the airplane struck a berm, nosed over, and came to rest inverted. On the Owner/Operator Aircraft Accident Report (NTSB Form 6120.1/2) safety recommendation block, the pilot recommended in part "Have more fuel on board."

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to refuel the airplane resulting in a loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion. A contributing factor was the lack of suitable terrain for the forced landing.

FTW02LA218

On July 29, 2002, at 1053 central daylight time, a Cessna 182Q single-engine airplane, N4896N, being operated as Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Flight 4248, was substantially damage during a forced landing following a loss of engine power while on approach to the McAllen Miller International Airport (MFE), McAllen, Texas. The airplane was owned and operated by the Civil Air Patrol, Inc., of Maxwell Air Force Base, near Montgomery, Alabama. The commercial pilot, sole occupant of the airplane, received minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 public use positioning flight. The cross-country flight departed Rio Grande City (67R), Texas, at 1000.

The day before the accident, the airplane was fueled with 50.8 gallons of aviation fuel. The 856-hour pilot reported that the airplane was full of fuel (88 gallons usable) when it was flown from Waco, Texas, to the Stinson Municipal Airport (SSF) near San Antonio, Texas. The flight time for that day 1.7 hours.

On the morning of the accident flight, during his preflight inspection at SSF, the pilot determined that he had sufficient fuel (65 gallons) for the planned flight to 67R. The pilot filed a flight time of 3 hour and 15 minutes on his VFR flight plan from SSF to MFE with a stop over at 67R.

The flight departed SSF at 0730 with 3 passengers on-board. The cruise altitude was 4,500 feet msl at a power setting of 2,250 rpm. The flight encountered a 25 knot headwind during cruise flight. The airplane landed at Rio Grande City, Texas, where the passengers deplaned. The pilot stated that fuel was not available at Rio Grande City, and the final destination was McAllen for refueling. At about 1000, the flight departed 67R for MFE.

At 1051:37, the pilot transmitted "McAllen tower this is CAP flight 4248, I'm declaring an emergency I'm running out of fuel."

At 1051:47, the pilot transmitted "I'm running out of fuel I have the airport in sight but I have no place to put this thing [airplane] down."

At 1051:50, the controller transmitted "CAP flight 4248 runway 13 cleared to land."

At 1053:03, the pilot transmitted "field right here in front of me."

Radar contact was lost and there were no further transmissions from the pilot.

The pilot reported that during the landing roll in the field, the airplane struck a berm, nosed over, and came to rest inverted. On the Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident Report (NTSB Form 6120.1/2) safety recommendation block, the pilot recommended in part "Have more fuel on board."

Accident occurred Sunday, July 21, 2002 in Englewood, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 4/1/2003
Aircraft: Cessna 182R, registration: N6271N
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

The wind was from 030 degrees at 9 knots, gusting to 15 knots, as the pilot made a simulated ILS approach to runway 35R. At decision height, the pilot transitioned to a visual approach and reduced power slightly to facilitate his descent and flared. The airplane ballooned and the pilot added a little power and maintained the attitude. The airplane landed hard, bounced, and came down on the nose wheel. He applied full power to reject the landing and the airplane began drifting to the left of the runway. The safety pilot took control of the airplane and returned it to the runway centerline. When the airplane touched down, it veered to the left, departed the runway, and skidded to a halt.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
the pilot-in-command's improper flare resulting in a hard landing. Contributing factors were the pilot's improper remedial action, and the second pilot's inadequate monitoring of the flight.

DEN02TA078

On July 21, 2002, at 1537 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182R, N6271N, owned and operated by the Civil Air Patrol (CAP), was substantially damaged during a hard landing at Centennial Airport, Englewood, Colorado. The pilot-in-command (PIC), a safety pilot (SP), and a pilot rated-passenger serving as a scanner escaped injury. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the public use cross-country flight being operated under Title 14 CFR Part 91. The flight originated from Canon City, Colorado, approximately 1455.

Accident occurred Thursday, June 06, 2002 in SEDONA, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/25/2003
Aircraft: Cessna 182Q, registration: N94986
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

Just as the pilot began to flare, he experienced a rapid descent to the ground, which resulted in a hard landing. The airplane bounced; the pilot added power on the second bounce and initiated a go-around. The airplane porpoised and contacted the ground one more time before becoming airborne. During the landing roll, the nose began to vibrate and the vibration worsened as he slowed down. Post landing inspection revealed that the nose wheel was flat and the fuselage and firewall were rippled.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's inadequate recovery from a bounced landing.

LAX02LA194

On June 6, 2002, about 1200 mountain standard time, a Cessna 182Q, N94986, made a hard landing at Sedona, Arizona. The Civil Air Patrol (CAP) was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91. The private pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The personal local flight departed Sedona about 1120. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

Accident occurred Saturday, January 26, 2002 in Levittown, PR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 8/28/2002
Aircraft: Cessna 172P, registration: N99295
Injuries: 2 Minor.

According to the pilot, 5 minutes after takeoff, all roll control was lost at both pilot's yokes. The pilot chose a field for an emergency landing, decided against a rudder only turn into the prevailing wind, and landed straight ahead. The field was a coastal swamp area and the aircraft sustained landing gear and wing damage. Post crash examination revealed aileron control cable separation near the turning pulley located at the left side cockpit overhead. NTSB Materials Laboratory examination of the cable fracture site revealed extensive corrosion damage to individual wire strands, with many strands corroded completely through. The aircraft had undergone an annual inspection 31.2 flight hours prior to the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
the failure of maintenance personnel to comply with aircraft manufacturer's inspection procedures, resulting in corrosion and separation of the aileron control cable in flight and the subsequent forced landing in a swamp.

MIA02LA051

On January 26, 2002, about 0910 Atlantic standard time, a Cessna 172P, N99295, registered to the Civil Air Patrol, Inc., operating as a Title 14 CFR Part 91 instructional flight, crashed while maneuvering in the vicinity of Levittown, Puerto Rico. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The aircraft received substantial damage, and the private-rated pilot and commercially-rated safety pilot received minor injuries. The flight departed San Juan's Isla Grande Airport about 5 minutes before the accident.

Accident occurred Thursday, August 23, 2001 in Elizabethtown, KY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/28/2001
Aircraft: Cessna 182R, registration: N5419E
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

The Civil Air Patrol (CAP) pilot elected to make a flight with an inoperative right brake. He found that the brake was inoperative during his pre-flight inspection, from a write-up left by the previous pilot. He talked to the CAP wing maintenance officer, and together they agreed that the pilot would ferry the airplane to another airport for maintenance. He departed without incident. In the landing pattern at the destination airport, the pilot elected to land with a 10-knot quartering tailwind with no flaps. He was unable to stop the airplane on the 5,000-foot runway, and it ran off the departure end. The airplane went through a ditch, and came to rest inverted in a cornfield. An aluminum brake line attached to the right side tubular steel landing gear strut had chaffed against the aluminum covering over the strut, and developed a leak near the lower end of the strut. Dried hydraulic fluid was found inside the aluminum covering. The mechanic who performed the last inspection stated that he did not normally remove the aluminum fairings which were installed over the tubular steed landing gear strut.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper decision to fly the airplane with a known deficiency, and his inflight decision to land with a quartering tailwind. A factor was the wing maintenance officer's concurrence to fly the airplane with the known deficiency.

On May 20, 2001, about 1710 Alaska daylight time, a wheel-equipped Cessna 172P airplane, N98426, sustained substantial damage while taxiing for takeoff at the Lake Hood Strip, Anchorage, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) positioning flight under Title 14, CFR Part 91, when the accident occurred. The airplane was operated by the Civil Air Patrol Inc., Elmendorf AFB, Anchorage. The private certificated pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed.

On April 19, 2001, about 1600 Alaska daylight time, a wheel/ski equipped deHavilland DHC-2 airplane, N4793C, sustained substantial damage while taxiing from landing at the Lake Hood Strip, Anchorage, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) local area government flight under Title 14, CFR Part 91, when the accident occurred. The airplane was operated by the Civil Air Patrol, Inc., Elmendorf Air Force Base, Anchorage. The commercial certificated pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The flight originated at Merrill Field, Anchorage, about 1530.

On April 6, 2001, at about 1815 eastern standard time, a Cessna 182Q, N74SM, registered to the Civil Air Patrol Inc., operating as a 14 CFR Part 91 positioning flight collided with the runway on landing at Lakeland-Linder Regional Airport, Lakeland, Florida. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a VFR flight plan was filed. The airplane sustained substantial damage, and the private pilot reported no injuries. The flight originated from North Perry Airport, Hollywood, Florida, about 1 hour 55 minutes before the accident.

On March 3, 2001, about 1030 eastern standard time, a Cessna 182Q, N4949N, registered to Civil Air Patrol, Inc., experienced a loss of directional control on landing and nosed over at the Melbourne International Airport, Melbourne, Florida. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the 14 CFR Part 91 personal flight. The airplane was substantially damaged and the commercial-rated pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The flight originated about 1 hour earlier from the Merritt Island Airport, Cocoa, Florida.

On July 21, 2000, approximately 1450 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182R, N101SP, registered to and operated by the Civil Air Patrol (CAP), and being flown by a private pilot, was substantially damaged during the touchdown/landing roll at the John Day State airport, John Day, Oregon. The pilot was uninjured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan had been filed, but not activated. The flight, which was a combined proficiency flight for the pilot and positioning flight for the aircraft, was being operated as a public use operation, and originated approximately 1345, at Redmond, Oregon.

Note: By respect for the victims and their relatives, this page doesn't include the (numerous) fatal accident reports.